Why don’t we rock down to electric avenue? Because an original Gold Medallion home called the Garden Penthouse is for sale. In a post World War II society, electrical efficiency was a highly sought after medium to power the United States. And in a wave of technological advancement, this type of energy production became extremely popular during the 1950s, 60s, and 70s, when several companies started to experiment with all-electric floor plans. As a result, the term “Gold Medallion home” came about, which was a program marketing electrical housing frames as the future energy source for households across the United States. Consequently, many mid-century modern homes were built with this concept in mind and were granted a Gold Medallion, signifying the electrical efficiency of the structure.

With that in mind, a home entitled the “Garden Penthouse” was given the medal back in 1963, when it was displayed at the Los Angeles County Fair as an example of modern living. Designed by Douglas W. Henderson, this home was fashioned under a slew of architecture types, blending mid-century modern, formalist, Hollywood regency, and ranch style all into one eclectic showpiece.

An advertisement for the "Garden Penthouse" showcase at the 1963 Los Angeles County Fair.
An advertisement for the Garden Penthouse at the 1963 Los Angeles County Fair. Courtesy of Matthew Berkley and Scott Lander.

Today, the Garden Penthouse has been put up for sale in all of its “Gold Medallion glory.” And not only has it retained a majority of its features (such as the Asian-inspired den and the kitchen’s wood detailing), but it has also been preserved as a mid-century marvel, boasting its electric housing frame and unique history to all those that lay eyes on it.

The Asian-inspired den of the "Garden Penthouse."
The Asian-inspired den, complete with seashell lamps and shoji sliding screen doors. Photography by Cameron Carothers; Courtesy of Matthew Berkley and Scott Lander.
The original wood detailing of the "Garden Penthouse."
The original wood detailing of this eclectic “idea home.” Photography by Cameron Carothers; Courtesy of Matthew Berkley and Scott Lander.

The Garden Penthouse, located in Upland, CA, is currently being sold by Matthew Berkley and Scott Lander of Deasy Penner Podley at an asking price of $739,000. Could this be your new “Mid-Century Oasis?”

The almost un-changed exterior of the "Garden Penthouse."
The almost unchanged exterior of the Garden Penthouse. Photography by Cameron Carothers; Courtesy of Matthew Berkley and Scott Lander.

Learn more about the Garden Penthouse at la.curbed.com!